lpcrochet


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How To Tuesday — Maggie Leg Warmers

Here it is 🙂 The long awaited new pattern post. This pattern gave me some trouble when I sent it to testers. I realized last night (with the help of my best friend) that I was just using the wrong stitch name. It made it confusing. There are so many variations of the “star stitch”. The stitch used in this pattern is actually the “5-Star Marguerite Stitch” — so I decided to give them a lovey nick-name. Presenting the Maggie Leg Warmers!

crochet leg warmers

Ta-daah! (Modeled by my BFF)

In Colorado “Fall” can mean picturesque brisk days with beautiful falling leaves in varying shades of reds, greens, and yellows. Sometimes, I walk around the neighborhood and just stare in wonder and adoration at this gorgeous place I am lucky enough to call home.

However.

“Fall” in Colorado can also mean HOT days of “Indian Summer”.

It can also mean two feet of snow and blistering wind.

I prefer the perfect days (ha, who doesn’t?!)

One of the very best things about Fall? Big, comfy, lovely accessories! I’m cheap  frugal, so I prefer to make my own.

I’ve been admiring outfits on Pinterest for quite sometime, and one of my very favorite looks is the pairing of knee high boots with some cozy leg warmers. I like boot cuffs, but I wanted to come up with a warmer that can go over the boots.

So, I now present to you what I came up with over the weekend (you know.. that weekend 3 weeks ago..)

It took some help from testers to get it looking right AND functional, but I am happy with the end result!

Now, since I’ve saved money on the accessories, I can spend more on the boots… right?

Finished dimensions: 12″ (height) x *13″ (width)

*This pattern is easily adjusted to fit any size leg — Just measure the circumference of your calf before you get started, and add or subtract rows to adjust the width. This pattern is meant to overlap, so it should be bigger around than your calf.

Materials used:

yarn, crochet hook, buttons

Materials needed ( ^ That is not enough yarn for a pair).

J hook (6.0mm)

*Approx. 6 oz (*Approx. 300 yds) worsted weight acrylic yarn (shown – I Love This Yarn in Sungold)

Trim shown – Bernat Pipsqueak in Chocolate

Buttons (I used 5 buttons on each leg warmer)

Stitches/Terms used (US terminology):

st – stitch

ch – chain

yo – yarn over

sc – single crochet (insert hook into st, yo, pull up loop, yo, pull through both loops)

hdc – half double crochet (yo, insert hook into st, yo, pull up loop, yo pull through all 3 loops)

dc – double crochet (yo, insert hook into st, yo, pull up loop, yo pull through 2 loops, yo, pull up loop, yo, pull through both loops)

Beginning Marguerite cluster st (BegMC) – insert hook into same st (hdc in this pattern), yo pull up loop, *insert hook into next st, yo pull up loop* repeat from * 3 times (you should have 6 loops on hook), yo pull through all loops, ch 1 (creating the “eye” of the star)

Marguerite Cluster St (MC)– insert hook into “eye” of star, yo pull up loop, insert hook into front of last loop of star, yo pull up loop, insert hook into same st as the last loop of the previous star, yo pull up loop (you should have 4 loops on hook) *insert hook into next st, yo pull up loop* repeat from *one time (you should have 6 loops on hook) yo, pull through all loops, ch 1 (creating the “eye” of the star)

I cannot find a video for this stitch the way that I do it. I had a link here, but opted to remove it. I’m going to make my own video (..maybe..) and add it here, so if you NEED the video — have no fear — it’s coming soon(ish)! For now, I’ve got that nifty photo tutorial at the end of the pattern.

*Make sure you have enough material to make two. 🙂 — The amount listed is a ROUGH estimate. 2 skeins of a basic worsted weight should be plenty.

Ch  42

R1: hdc in 2nd ch from hook and in each chain to the end (41 hdc)

Beginning chain does not count as a stitch here, or anywhere throughout the pattern.

R2: Ch 2, turn, hdc in same st, begMC, MC (x18), hdc in same st (top of first st of previous row — total of 19 MC sts)

R3: Ch 1, turn, sc in first hdc, 2 sc in “eye” of star st, and every star st down the row, 1 sc in last hdc, sc in top of first st of previous row (41 sc)

R4: Ch 2, turn, hdc in same st and every st down row (41 hdc)

R5 (buttonhole row): Ch 2, turn, dc in same st and every st down the row (41 dc)

R6-R8: Repeat rows 2-4

R9: Repeat row 4 (41 hdc)

R10- 36 (or desired circumference is met): Repeat rows 6-9, ending with a hdc row.

At the end of your final row, finish last st with trim yarn.

sc around the top, the beginning length edge, and the bottom

fasten off, weave in ends and attach buttons to front side on the un-trimmed edge.

Your double crochet row will function as the buttonholes.

I originally wrote this pattern using an I hook. When I switched it up to the J hook, I also added the dc row to be used as the buttonhole row (assuming I would still need a buttonhole row). If your gauge is like mine, You really don’t HAVE to use a dc row when using a J hook (the hdc’s would have sufficed for me), but — it was already added, so there it stays haha! Feel free to move that dc row to wherever you would like your buttonhole row to be (Just switch it out with a hdc row). As long as it’s near the beginning somewhere, you should be fine. Also, I considered making it taper down — I didn’t. On purpose. I didn’t design these legwarmers to go over leggings. I designed them to go over BOOTS, so they are supposed to be a little wider around the bottom to accommodate boots. Personally, I think the pair I made for myself look pretty darling slouching over my foot a little without the boot, but that might just be me.

I’ve been nervous about posting this one. I don’t know why, exactly. I don’t typically stray away from head/neck wear, I guess.  I hope you guys love it as much as I do! My Little has already demanded requested a pair for her in pink and purple (of course). She even picked out her own buttons at Hobby Lobby 😛

Who else is in love with the texture of the Marguerite Cluster Stitch??

 I don’t want to get all repetitive with this stitch, but I do have plans for a couple more accessories featuring it. It’s just. so. pretty. 🙂


15 Comments

How-To Tuesday — Criss Cross Chunky Cowl

Lilly has been up all night with an ear infection, so I’m going to try to get this written and posted before the doctor’s office opens. Fortunately, she doesn’t seem as miserable now as she was from midnight to 6 am. There’s something about the middle of the night that makes all illnesses worse, am I right?

Anyway, on to the pattern!

chunky cross stitch cowl lpcrochet

This one is pretty simple, so I didn’t have it tested, so please don’t hesitate to let me know if there is anything weird about it,  but I’m *pretty sure* it should be easy to follow.

I’m a fan of any pattern that is:

1. Fast to work up

and

2. Beautiful when finished

This pattern is definitely both of these, so I figured I had a keeper this week!

Ready to get started?

Materials Needed:

Super Bulky yarn (I used Lion Brand HomeTown USA in Los Angeles Tan) — Just under 2 skeins made the one pictured.

3 Buttons (My oldest found mine at Hobby Lobby)

*Size L hook (sorry, I forgot to put that in this morning! I blame sleep deprivation :P)

Needle for weaving ends

Terms used (US terminology):

ch – chain

st – stitch

dc – double crochet

xst – cross stitch – skip next st, dc into following st, go back and dc into skipped st (see pictures below)

Ch 75

(you can easily adjust the size by adding/subtracting beginning chains)

R1: dc into 3rd ch from hook and all the way down the row

R2: Ch 3 (counts as dc here and throughout) *xst over next two sts* repeat to end, finishing the row with a dc into the top of the turning ch of the previous row

R3: Ch 3, dc into the top of each xst (ending in the turning ch) from the previous row

R4-11: Repeat rows 2 and 3 alternately, ending with a dc row

Finish off and weave in your ends

Attach buttons evenly spaced vertically on one end — you can use any stitch space on the other end as a ‘button-hole’

The end! Super easy, right?

And here are some pictures for reference (and then some of me showing off how much I love this thing haha :P):

I’ve had a question about stitch placements in the row following the xst row — here are some pictures to help clear up any confusion!


7 Comments

How-To Tuesday — Fingerless Gloves

It’s Tuesday! Are you excited?! I am 😛

I am going to totally shock you all today and post a pattern for something that is NOT a slouchy hat! You know I love some slouchy hats, but I thought I’d change it up a little this week. Also, I wrote this pattern over a year ago, so most of the work was already done.

And who doesn’t love fingerless gloves, right? They’re cute, warm, and allow you the freedom to answer calls and texts without taking your glove off!

crochet fingerless gloves

Materials Needed: WW yarn of your choice (Pictured – Vickie Howell for Caron, Sheep(ish) in Teal(ish).) One skein is more than plenty. I/9 5.5mm crochet hook needle for weaving ends Buttons of your choice (Pictured – La Mode style 24811 from JoAnn’s)

Stitches/Terms used (US terms): hdc –  half double crochet

sc –  single crochet

sl st- slip stitch

blo – back loop only

Whipstitch (used for sewing on strap — see video here: http://youtu.be/RBYfdRgy5II)

Finished Measurements: Body of glove – 8 inches length x 3.5 inches width Strap – 3.5 inches length x 1.25 (or slightly less) inches tall

Body:

Chain 30 Row 1: In 3rd ch from hook, hdc blo, and every st until the end (28 hdc) Rows 2 – 17: Ch 2, turn work, hdc blo next st and down the rest of the row (28 hdc) (measure against your wrist – if not yet big enough to go around, make another row and measure again), do not fasten off. Row 18: Joining row – Ch 1, sl st two sides together creating a seam up the side of your work next 20 sts. At st 21, sl st up only one side of seam (creating hole for thumb) for next 7 stitches. Ch 1, sl st into final chain, joining work and creating the hole for your thumb. Do NOT fasten off. Thumb Hole: Sc around your thumb hole (16 sc), do not join rows, sc 4 rows (16 sc each) or until desired length. Fasten off, weave ends.

Turn your work inside out.

Bottom Cuff: Join yarn at side seam. Row 1: Ch 2, HDC around (approx. 24 hdc* see note below). Join with sl st into top of beginning stitch. Row 2: Ch 2, hdc blo each stitch (24 hdc). Join with sl st into top of beginning stitch. Fasten off (or make more rows until desired length), weave ends (into the inside of your work).

Top Cuff: Join yarn at side seam. Row 1: Ch 2, hdc around (approx. 24 hdc* – see note below). Join with sl st into top of beginning st. Rows 2-4: Ch 2, hdc blo around (24 hdc). Join with sl st into top of beginning st. Row 5: Ch1, sc blo around (24 sc). Join with sl st into top of beginning chain, fasten off, weave ends on the inside of your work.

Strap: Ch 15 Row 1: hdc into 3rd ch from hook and down (12 hdc). Rows 2-3: Ch 2, hdc to end (12 hdc). Fasten off. Leave tail long enough to sew onto glove. Whipstitch onto glove just below the thumb hole (see picture for placement). Add button to the opposite end of strap, whipstitch button side onto glove (see picture for placement).

–And I know this sounds dumb and should be a no-brainer, but I wouldn’t include it if I hadn’t stupidly done this before myself (ha! I was SO mad!): Make sure you don’t accidentally create 2 right/left gloves by misplacement of strap — With thumbs placed to the inside (next to each other), you should have one glove with a button on the right side of the glove, and one glove with a button on the left side of the glove (Right glove/right side button, Left glove/left side button). *Approx 24 stitches around, possibly more if you needed more original rows in body to adjust for your wrist size.

Pictures (click to enlarge):


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How-To Tuesday — “The Rosie” Flower Top Slouch

Are you all ready for this week’s pattern?! I know I am. This one is a little more complicated than what I’ve posted so far, but I’ve had it vigorously tested (ha!) and am confident that you will be able to follow. And if you can’t, I’ve gone over it enough times that I should be able to answer any question about any row off the top of my head.

I have lived and breathed this pattern since Friday night. I’ve altered the first few rows from the original design to make it less confusing, and I’m happy with the way it’s turned out!

I’ve been lusting after these adorable mandala/flower/open-work hat designs for quite a little while. Originally, I was going to go a whole different direction with this hat and make the brim the focal point of the finished product, but after seeing the way it was turning out, I decided this is a stand alone design. I’m saving the other idea for a future post (so I’m not even going to tell you anything about it!! Muah-ha-ha!)

Now — Onto the pattern! This is what we’re going to make:

crochet flower top slouch hat

Dubbed “The Rosie” by the one facebook fan who responded to my request to help name it haha — I would have picked that suggestion out of many, though, so it’s better no one else tried 😛

Note — try not to stitch too tightly in the first few rounds. If you know you typically stitch tightly, maybe go up a hook size for the first 4 rounds or so (maybe even the first 8). I’m going to try that on my next one to see if it makes the top come out a little less “pointy”.

Pay very close attention to your stitch counts and placements in the first 8 rows (especially rows 6, 7, and 8). These rows might literally kill me. I hate math, and it shows in the wonky stitch counts in these 3 rows. It WILL work if you are diligently paying attention. I promise ♡ It’s not hard, just easy to lose count.

Materials needed:

3 colors of DK weight yarn (size 3) – One Main Color (MC), and Two accent colors (A1, A2)

Colors shown – Bernat Cotton(ish) by Vickie Howell:

(I highly recommend working up this hat in a cotton blend — Cottonish if you can get it)

MC = Brown

A1 = Cream

A2 = Purple

Size G (4.0 mm) Hook

Needle for weaving ends

Terms Used (US terminology):

Ch: Chain

sl st: slip stitch

dc: double crochet

sc: single crochet

shell: three dc into the same stitch

dc2tog; double crochet 2 together – yo, insert hook into st, pull up a loop, yo, pull through two loops on hook, yo, insert into next st, pull up a loop, yo, pull through two loops on hook, yo, pull through remaining (three) loops on hook.

hdc: half double crochet

bpdc: back post double crochet – yo, insert hook from back to front to back around post (body) of corresponding stitch below, yo, pull up loop, yo, pull through two loops on hook, yo, pull through remaining 2 loops on hook

bphdc: back post half double crochet – yo, insert hook from back to front to back around post (body) of corresponding stitch below, yo, pull up loop, yo, pull through all three loops on hook

join: connecting a completed row by placing a sl st into the top of the beginning chain.

blo: back loop only — inserting hook into only the back loop of the stitch.

*Throughout this pattern, the beginning chain of each row will ALWAYS count as a stitch.*

R1 (Top Flower — Color A2):

ch 4, join, ch 2, 2dc into ring, sl st, *ch 2, 2 dc into ring, sl st* repeat from * 3 times, creating a 5 petaled flower. After last sl st, ch 3, *sc into top of 2nd dc of the next petal, ch 3* repeat from * 4 times and join with sl st into first sc. (You should now have a 5 petaled flower inside a circle)

Fasten off.

R2 (Color A1):

Join color A1 in any sc, *shell (3 dc) into adjoining ch 3 space from previous row, ch 3, skip next petal* repeat from * 4 times, join (5 shells, 5 ch 2 spaces)

R3:

Ch 3, dc into next 2 sts, 2 dc into ch 3 space, *dc next 3 sts, 2 dc into ch 3 space* repeat from * 3 times — change to MC at the end of this row by finishing (pulling through last two loops of) last st with the MC, join (25 dc)

R4 (Main Color):

Ch 3, 2 dc into same st, ch 2, skip 2 sts, *Shell into next st, ch 2, sk 2 sts* repeat around and join (after last shell/ch 2, you will have 3 sts, skip all 3. Don’t shell into the last st). (8 shells, 8 ch 2 spaces)

R5:

Ch 3, dc into next 2 sts, 2 dc into chain 2 space from previous row, *dc next 3 sts, 2 dc into chain 2 space* repeat from * around, change to color A1 at the end of the row (as before), join (40 dc)

– Don’t worry if your work is kind of curling up and slightly resembling a sombrero

:P

Just keep going. It will work itself out, and won’t be noticeable in the finished product! ♡

R6 (Color A1):

Ch 3, 2 dc into same st, ch 2, sk 3 sts, *shell into next st, ch 2, sk 2* repeat from * around, join (13 shells, 13 ch 2 spaces)

R7:

Ch 3, dc next 2 sts, 2 dc into ch 2 space from previous row, *dc next 3 sts, 2 dc into ch 2 space* repeat around, changing to MC at the end (as before), join (65 dc)

R8 (MC):

Ch 3, 2 dc into same st, ch 2, sk 2, *shell into next st, ch 2, sk 2* repeat from * 19 times, shell in next st, ch1 sk 1, join (22 shells, 22 ch spaces)

R9:

Ch 3, dc next 2 sts, ONE dc into ch 2 space from previous row, *dc next 3 sts, ONE dc in ch 2 space* repeat from * around, join (88 dc)

R10-12 (continue using MC):

* Reminder – Beginning chain always counts as a stitch 🙂 *

Ch 3, dc next st and in each st around, join (88 dc) *change color to A2 at the end of R12 (as before) join

R13 (Color A2):

Ch 2, hdc in next st and each st around, changing to color A1 in last st (as before) join (88 hdc)

R14 (Color A1):

Ch 3, 2 dc in same st, ch 3, sk 3, *shell into next st, ch 3, sk 3* repeat from * around (22 shells, 22 ch 3 spaces)

R15:

Ch 3, dc next 2 sts, 1 dc into ch 3 space, *dc next 3 sts, 1 dc into ch 3 space* repeat from * around, changing to color A2 at the end of the row (88 dc)

R16 (color A2):

Ch 2, hdc in next st and each st around, changing to MC at the end of the row (88 hdc)

R17-24 (MC):

Ch 3, dc into next st and each st around, join (88 dc) *change to color A2 at the end of row 24

BRIM:

R1 (color A2):

Ch 3, working in blo, dc2tog over next 2 sts *dc next 7 sts, dc2tog over next 2 sts* repeat from * 8 times, dc next 4 sts, changing to color A1 at the end of the row, join (76 dc)

R2 (color A1):

Ch 3, bpdc next st and each st around (last bpdc will go around beginning ch 3) changing to color A2 at the end of the row, join (76 bpdc)

R3 (color A2):

Ch 3, bpdc next st and each st around changing to color A1 at the end of the row, join (76 bpdc)

R4 (color A1):

Repeat brim row 2, changing to MC at the end of the row (76 bpdc)

R5 (MC);

Ch 2, bphdc next st and each st around, join (76 bphdc)

R6:

Ch 2, hdc under all loops (between post of previous row) of next st, and each st around (76 hdc)

Finish off, weave in ends.

 

Pics (click to enlarge):


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How-To Tuesday (…Errmm.. I mean Wednesday)– Puff Stitch Slouch

I sincerely apologize for the late edition. I dropped the ball and was late asking for testers, then ran out of daylight to take pictures.. Anyway, I hope you enjoy today’s pattern!

Today I am sharing with you one of my absolute favorite things to make. The puff stitch hat (slouchy version).

These hats are awesome because:

1. They’re pretty flippin easy and fast to make.

2. They’re super cute — always one of my best sellers at craft shows.

I’m currently building up my stock for an upcoming two-day craft show next month, so I’ve been whipping these up like crazy.

What you need:

About a skein of yarn (for an adult sized hat) — it’s a bit of a wool-eater

(The yarn I used is Bernat Mosaic – Aura)

‘I’ hook (5.5mm)

Yarn needle (for weaving ends)

Terms Used (US terminology):

st – stitch

yo – yarn over

sl st – slip stitch

ch – chain

bho – back ‘hump’ only (there is a picture down there)

 Stitches used:

Puff stitch – (yo, insert hook into st, pull up loop, yo, insert hook into (same) st, pull up loop, yo, insert hook into (same) st, pull up loop, finish by yo and pulling through all (7) loops on hook and locking it with a sl st on top)

sc (single crochet) – insert hook into st, yo, pull up loop, yo pull through both loops

hdc – yo, insert hook into st, yo, pull up loop, yo, pull through all (3) loops

hdc dec – yo, insert hook into st, pull up loop, yo, insert into NEXT st, pull up loop, yo, pull through all (5) loops

Ok! Ready?

Start by making a magic ring (don’t know how? Here is a good video: http://youtu.be/gEq48ABHRZo)

*The way I start: Ch 5, join with sl st to first ch. Work (around the tail) into the circle created, pull tail tight to close.*

*For the beginning puff stitch of each round, you will always ch 2 first*

R1: Ch 2 (as part of first puff st)  6 puff stitches into the ring.  Join with a sc into top of beginning ch2

R2: Ch 2, Puff stitch into the joining sc, *work 2 Puff stitches into the space made between each puff of the first round* repeat around until you reach the end. When you get back to that first, lonely, puff, finish the round with one more puff into that beginning sc and join into the top of the first puff with a sc (12 Puffs)

R3: Ch 2, Puff stitch into the joining sc, *work one puff stitch into the next space, 2 puffs into the next space* repeat around increasing in every other space until you reach the end. Give that beginning puff a friend and join at the top with a sc (18 Puffs)

R4: Ch 2, Puff stitch into the joining sc, *work one puff stitch into the next space, one puff stitch into the next space, 2 puffs into the next space* repeat around increasing in every 3rd space until you reach the end, puff stitch into the beginning sc and join at the top of beginning puff with a sc (24 Puffs)

R5: Ch 2, Puff stitch into the joining sc, *work one puff stitch into the next space, one puff stitch into the next space, one puff stitch into the next space, 2 puffs into the next space* repeat around increasing in every 4th stitch until you reach the end, puff stitch into the beginning sc and join at the top of beginning puff with a sc (30 Puffs)

R6: Ch2, Puff stitch into the joining sc, *work one puff stitch into the next space, one puff stitch into the next space, one puff stitch into the next space, one puff stitch into the next space, 2 puffs into the next space* repeat around increasing in every 5th stitch until you reach the end, puff stitch into the beginning sc and join at the top of the beginning puff with a sc (36 Puffs)

R7: Ch 2, Puff stitch into the joining sc, *work one puff stitch in each space all the way around* joining at the top of the beginning puff with a sc (36 Puffs)

R8-17: Repeat Round 7

Brim:

R1: Ch 2, hdc into joining sc, hdc into the top of the beginning puff of previous round, *hdc into next space, hdc into top of next puff* repeat from * all the way around, joining with a sl st into top of the first hdc (72 hdc)

R2 (You will be working in bho from now on): Ch 1, Working in bho (see pics), hdc into next st, hdc dec over next 2 sts, *hdc next 5 sts, hdc dec, over next 2 sts* repeat from * 8 times,  hdc next 6 sts, join with sl st (bho) into beginning hdc (62 hdc)

R3: Ch 1, hdc (bho) into next st (not joining st), and all the way around, joining with sl st (bho) into beginning hdc (61 hdc)

R4 -5(or desired length): Ch 1, hdc (bho) into joining st and all the way around, joining with sl st into beginning hdc (61 hdc) Finish off and weave in your end 

Ta-daah! Easy peasy, right?

Here are some reference pics:

Happy Wednesday lovely readers 🙂 I hope you are doing something enjoyable. My littlest and I are headed to the splash park in a few minutes with friends. I, of course, will be packing yarn and hook 🙂


19 Comments

How-To Tuesday — Chevron Slouch Beanie

I seem to have caught the Chevron Mania.

You too?

Well, in honor of the mania, I’ve written up a pattern/tutorial for this awesome Chevron Slouch beanie! I hope you enjoy! I haven’t written many patterns, and have only had this one “tested” by myself. Please don’t hesitate to point out any mistakes, or ask questions if there is anything that doesn’t make sense to you.

I love this pattern because it’s super easy once you get the rhythm down — that is awesome because it allows you to watch TV or carry on a conversation without losing your place. But, if you DO lose your place, it becomes apparent before you get too far, so it’s easy to go back and fix a mistake (maybe ONE row later, rather than when you’re sewing up the seam).

Anyway, on to the pattern!

Materials Needed:

Yarn — (duh) I used a DK Cotton blend (Vickie Howell’s Cotton-ish by Bernat) I used less than half of a skein of each color

I’m going to refer to colors as Color A (brown in my hat) and Color B (cream in my hat)

G Hook

Yarn needle

Stitches/Terms Used (US terminology):

Ch – chain

DC – Double Crochet

dc2tog (double crochet 2 together) – Yarn over, insert hook into stitch, pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through 2 loops, yarn over, insert hook into next stitch, pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through 2 loops, yarn over, pull through remaining (3) loops

DC inc (double crochet increase) – 2 DC in same stitch

HDC – half double crochet

SC -single crochet

BLO – back loops only

With Color A chain 87

Row 1:

DC into 4th chain from hook (3 chains left = 1 DC)

*DC next 3 sts

2 dc2tog over next 4 sts (dc2tog, dc2tog)

DC next 3 sts

DC inc next 2 sts (4 DC over 2 sts)*

Repeat from * ending with ONE DC INC (2 DC) in last st

Row 2:

Turn

Ch 3 (counts as 1 DC here and throughout)

DC into first st

*DC next 3 sts

2 dc2tog over next 4 sts (dc2tog, dc2tog)

DC next 3 sts

DC inc next 2 sts (4 DC over 2 sts)*

Repeat from * ending with ONE DC INC (2 DC) into top of turning ch

I change colors every 2 rows — to change color: At the end of the previous color’s row, finish the last stitch by pulling new color through the final 2 loops of the last DC, ch 3 and you’ve now switched over 🙂

Rows 3 – 23:

Repeat Row 2, changing colors every 2 rows, ending with ONE row of Color B

Edging: 

Change to Color A at the end of Row 23

Turn

Ch 2

HDC into first st

*HDC next 3 sts (stand alone DC sts)

DC next 2 sts (“valley” dc2tog sts from previous row)

HDC next 3 sts (stand alone DC sts)

SC next 4 (“peak” DC inc sts from previous row)*

Repeat from * to the end

Do NOT fasten off

Sewing the side seam:

With the WS (wrong side) facing you (RS — right side on the inside), line up your chevron stripes and SC the sides together (see pic below)

Cinching the top:

When you finish your SC up the side seam, cut off your yarn, leaving a long tail (I leave about 18 inches, just to be safe)

Whip stitch around the top, inserting your yarn needle about every 4 sts

When you reach the beginning, pull tight to cinch the top together

I like to go through the middle a couple of extra times to make sure it doesn’t come apart

Tie off with a knot

Flip the hat “right side out”

Brim:

Join with Color A at the seam

HDC in BLO around the edging row

Do not join rounds (you can use a stitch marker to keep your place if you want, but I just eyeballed it by where I joined at the seam)

Keep going until your brim is your desired size (mine is about 5 rows) and fasten off and weave in your ends!

This hat took a little longer than my usual to make a hat, because using a smaller weight yarn/smaller hook = more overall stitches. I went ahead and started making another in worsted acrylic to see how one would need to adjust the stitch/row counts.  Here are the measurements/adjustments:

Finished Hat = approx. 9 inches (23 cm for the hat body (not including brim)

With DK weight (marked with a number 3 on package): 2 rows = approx. 3/4 of an inch (2 cm)

23 rows + edging row (with top cinched — takes a little off of the height) = approx. 9 inches (23 cm)

Brim (in DK) = just over 1 inch (approx. 3 cm) at 5 rows of HDC

When I switched to worsted weight (WW) acrylic, I used a size J hook and chained 63 (instead of 87) to reach the same circumference measurement (approx. 20 inches/51 cm)

With WW acrylic  (marked with a number 4 on package): 2 rows = 1 inch (3 cm)

17 rows + edging row (with top cinched) = approx. 9 inches (23 cm)

Brim (in WW) = just over 1 inch (approx. 3 cm) at 3 rows of HDC

As you can see, this pattern is easily adjusted to a variety of material. The WW version worked up VERY quickly.

*This particular pattern makes a slouchy hat that fits MY head. I’ve been told I have a relatively small(ish) head. If it’s not long enough for whoever’s head you’re hoping to accommodate, just add rows as needed until you reach the desired length. I like the look of ending with one row of Color B and edging with the brim color, but get creative!

I would love to see what you all come up with! Please post your pics (or links to them!).

You all know how I feel about putting constraints on what you can and cannot do with a finished product — Go. Do what you will with whatever you make. Give me credit for the pattern (link back if you don’t mind, I love the blog traffic!). Don’t steal my pictures. Don’t pretend that this is YOUR pattern. It’s free, so enjoy! Just don’t be lame and “plagiarism-y“. Please 🙂


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How-To Tuesday – Color Inspiration: Choosing Colors for your projects

“Why do two colors, put one next to the other, sing? Can one really explain this? no. Just as one can never learn how to paint.”
― Pablo Picasso

I think Mr. Bob Ross may disagree on the “one can never learn how to paint” (happy little trees..ha!), but what a beautiful quote. Some colors do just sing, don’t they? Lovely. I feel the same way about some yarns.. Anyway, on with the post.

When I started this blog (about a month ago! Time sure flies!), I reached out to fellow crafters and asked what they would like to read about. One crocheter asked how to choose colors for projects. Now, I don’t particularly consider myself an “expert” in anything really, but I happen to get quite a lot of compliments on my color choices. I’ve been struggling a little with how to describe my process for you. I think, because honestly, it’s mostly just intuition. My best projects are those I don’t have any problems picking colors for. Sometimes, I decide the color scheme before I even decide the project, like the yarn is asking to be used. I’ve even not started projects in the past because when I started thinking about what colors to choose it would give me anxiety, and who wants that?! This is supposed to be fun, and stress relieving, not inducing!

Tip: When I’m having a hard time envisioning how my colors are going to come together in a pattern, I actually grab my colored pencils and sketch it out. This has led to color scheme changes more times than I can count!

crochet hooks

Sometimes I just like to look at these pretties

So. Here goes. Some *hopefully* useful methods to assist in choosing color schemes.
  • Get Online – We all want to create things that everyone considers beautiful. I’m not saying go copy whatever is popular in cyberspace. I’m saying, one of the best ways to find out what color schemes are “hot” is to do a quick search of your favorite online shopping sites. Let it inspire you. 
  • Get Outside – Mother Nature is gorgeous if you’d just look at her! Head outside. Lift your head and look around. Stop looking at your phone 😛 (I’m guilty of that one sometimes). What do you see? More likely than not, some amazing colors!

“I think it pisses God off if you walk by the color purple in a field somewhere and don’t notice it.” 
― Alice WalkerThe Color Purple

Seriously. Look around you 🙂

  • Go Shopping – At the home improvement store. The paint sections at The Home Depot and Lowe’s are wonderful resources for finding gorgeous color palettes — AND they’re already put together for you! For FREE! Go grab some swatches!
Home Depot Paint Swatches

Example of some paint swatches you will find at The Home Depot — pretty, right?!

  • Experiment – Step outside your comfort zone. Go BOLD. Something. Just try something you wouldn’t normally try. If you’re apprehensive about potentially wasting time on the wrong colors — do what I do. Grab your colored pencils and sketch pad and release your inner artist!
bold

Some of us have an easier time “stepping outside the box” ..

I once bought what I considered to be a fantastically beautiful skein of yarn, only to come home and have my teenager announce that she thought it looked “vomit-ish”. Lo-and-behold, when I completed the scarf I intended it for, I was overwhelmed with compliments on, you guessed it, the colors! Even my opinionated teen later admitted that, when paired with the gunmetal grey, the chartreuse (yes.. really) actually looked quite good.

crochet scarf

Scarf in question — what do YOU think?

Color is more complicated than it seems. I’ve taken whole classes centered entirely around color theory and choosing colors that complement each other (in hair school, not for crafting, but someone should offer one!).  Get friendly with a color wheel and learn the basics of color theory. This site has a wonderful (and easy to follow) explanation: http://www.colormatters.com/color-and-design/basic-color-theory. It really is helpful to get to know the basics.

Color Wheel

Even a boring old color wheel is pretty to look at

Happy Tuesday! What colors are you currently working with? I’d love to hear what inspires you in choosing colors! Feel free to add your two cents in the comments. Any totally odd color combos that have just worked for you?